Education and Schools

education and schools
Figure 1.--For most of recorded history, few children attended any kind of school. Only in the West during the 19th century did contries begin educating tge entire population. Here the leaders were the Protestant states, especially un Germany and the United States. American schools not only provided a sound basic education, but assisted immigrant vchikldren from a wide range of countries in entering the American mainstream. Here we see an American public school at the turn-od-the 20th century.

The primary activity for children is now school. This was not always the case. For most of man's existence there were no schools. And even within recorded history, few children attended schools of any kind. Indormation on ancient times is sketchy. Even for Rome, the ancient civilization which we know most about, accounts vary. Education in the medieval era was very limited. By the late middle ages education in Europe began to become more widepread. School for much of Western history was reserved for the children of the well-todo. The Protestant Reformation which focused on personal Bible study was a major factor. Modern school systems began to appear in Europe and North America during the late-18th and early-19th century. Authorities by the late-19th century school was seen in most modern countries as the most important activity for children and compulsory education laws were passed and child labor gradually prohibited. These trend varied from country to country Education in the rest of the world varied, but for continued to be very limited until after World War II. School for most children is now the major experience with the world outside the home. About a third of the day is spent at school and about half of a child's waking hours.

Chronology

The primary activity for children is now school. This was not always the case. For most of man's existence there were no schools. And even within recorded history, few children attended schools of any kind. Indormation on ancient times is sketchy. Even for Rome, the ancient civilization which we know most about, accounts vary. Education in the medieval era was very limited. By the late middle ages education in Europe began to become more widepread. School for much of Western history was reserved for the children of the well-todo. The Protestant Reformation which focused on personal Bible study was a major factor. Modern school systems began to appear in Europe and North America during the late-18th and early-19th century. Authorities by the late-19th century school was seen in most modern countries as the most important activity for children and compulsory education laws were passed and child labor gradually prohibited. These trend varied from country to country Education in the rest of the world varied, but for continued to be very limited until after World War II.

Country Trends

China introduced the first state-funded schools in ancient times, but it was European that the first public schools seeking to educate the great bulk of the population first appeared. This development was associated with the Protestant Reformation which promoted individual Bible study. Thus the Protestant states of northern Europe, especially Germsny, have the longest history of public education. This tradition influenced the devbelopment of public education in the United States. Public education in Catholic southern Europe developed more slowly. Surprisingly, Britain was a relative laggard in public education because of the resistance of the landed gentry which had consideravble influence in Parliament. Education was limited outside Europe and North America. European missionaries introduced some of the first modern schools in Africa and Asia. Even in China with a tradition of schloarship, European missionaries introduced the fiesr schools with modern curriculum. Japan as part of the Mejii Restoration began building a modern school system on its own, but modeled on European education. Schools in Latin America were influenced by European systems.

Importance

School for most children is now the major experience with the world outside the home. About a third of the day is spent at school and about half of a child's waking hours.

Types

We have noticed many different types of modern schools around the world. The basic sifference is between private abd public (state schools), but beyond this basic division there are differences concerning age, gender, religion, and residential care. These different schools times have varied over time and from country to country. Most children of course are educated in public schools. Some countries (mostly totalitarian states) ban private schools.

School Uniform

The primary activity for children is now school. This was not always the case. School for much of Western history was reserved for the children of the well-todo. By the late 19th century school was seen in most modern countries as the most important activity for children and compulsory education laws were passed and child labor gradually prohibited. These trend varied from country to country as did school uniforms and schoolwear in geneal. School for most children is now the major experience with the world outside the home. About a third of the day is spent at school and about half of a child's waking hours. School clothing did not used to be a great issue. Mom and dad chose it or the school had a uniform. In our modern world, kids haver become much more concerned with their clothes. The cost of those clothes and conflicts associated weith them have caused many schools and parents to reaasess the school uniform. Some countries are beginning to reverse the decline in uniform usage. School uniforms have varried from country to country and over time. The school uniform familiar to our British friends consist of a blazer, school tie, and dress pants which is worn by boys in many countries, especially English-speaking countries. This uniform evolvedin the England during the late 19th century. Blazers were at first sports wear, but in the 1920s began to replace Eton suits and stiff Eton collars and by the 1930s had become the standard uniform at many private schools.







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Created: 8:14 PM 11/9/2010
Last updated: 8:14 PM 11/9/2010