Singapore


Figure 1.-- As recently as World War II there were jungle areas close to Singapoere and even undevelpped areas on Singapore Island. Today singapore Island is entirely developed and urbnized. There are lnd rclamatio projcts tocreate more lnd.

Almost all countris have a history dating back centuries if not millenia. This is not the case of singapore which until the 19th centyury was a mere fihing village. Today's Republic of Singapore, is a tiny city-state on an island at the tip of the Malay Peninsula in Southeast Asia. It was turned by the British from an undestinuished fishing village into a major colonial bulwark and part of its Malayan colony. Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founded Singapore as a trading post of the East India Company with permission from the Johor Sultanate (1819). The British subsequently obtained sovereignty over the island (1824). Singapore became one of the British Straits Settlements (1826). Its strategic location on the Malayn Straits gave it great imprtance. The development of the rubber industry turned Singapore into a financial powehouse. It was occupied by Japan at the onset of the Pacific War (1942). After the War it was part of Malaysia which Britain granted independence (1963). It was expelled by the Malaysian Parliament (1965). Ethnic and religuous differences were involved. Singapore has since developed rapidly into not only a huge port, but major financial center. Its patriarch Lee Kuan Yew adopted free market capitalism at a time when most newly independent countries persued socialism. The result was unlike widespread economic failure in most newly indeoendent countries wasin Singapore one of the most successful economies in the world. Singapore became one of the Asian Tigers which achieved rapid economic growth and high percapita incomes. Modern Singapore is highly urbanized. Little of the topical jungle folliage remains. The country's small territory has been expanded with land reclamation. Singapore' children wear practical western-style clothing. The tropical climate makes for casual, comfortable styles that are imported. There is not much of a textile manufacturing industry here due to the fact that the country has moved on into the secondary and tertiary industries. A reader in Singapore tells us that, "The clothes here are not exceptional, just what you would expect to wear in summer in the United States." HBC also has some information on Singapore schools and youth groups.

Geograpphy

Today's Republic of Singapore, is a tiny city-state on an island at the tip of the Malay Peninsula in Southeast Asia. Modern Singapore is highly urbanized. Little of the topical jungle folliage remains. The country's small territory has been expanded with land reclamation.

History

Almost all countris have a history dating back centuries if not millenia. This is not the case of singapore which until the 19th century was a mere fihing village. It was turned by the British from an undestinuished fishing village into a major colonial bulwark and part of its Malayan colony. Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles founded Singapore as a trading post of the East India Company with permission from the Johor Sultanate (1819). The British subsequently obtained sovereignty over the island (1824). Singapore became one of the British Straits Settlements (1826). Its strategic location on the Malayn Straits gave it great imprtance. The development of the rubber industry turned Singapore into a financial powehouse. It was occupied by Japan at the onset of the Pacific War (1942). The Japanese occupation was a terrible time for Singapore's largely ethnic-Chinese population. The Japanese considered the Chinese to be enemies and a security threat. After the War it was part of Malaysia which Britain granted independence (1963). It was expelled by the Malaysian Parliament (1965). Ethnic and religuous differences were involved.

Economy

Singapore has since developed rapidly into not only a huge port, but major financial center. Its patriarch Lee Kuan Yew adopted free market capitalism at a time when most newly independent countries persued socialism. The result was unlike widespread economic failure in most newly indeoendent countries was in Singapore one of the most successful economies in the world. Singapore became one of the Asian Tigers which achieved rapid economic growth and high percapita incomes.

Garments

Singapore' children wear practical western-style clothing. The tropical climate makes for casual, comfortable styles that are imported. There is not much of a textile manufacturing industry here due to the fact that the country has moved on into the secondary and tertiary industries. A reader in Singapore tells us that, "The clothes here are not exceptional, just what you would expect to wear in summer in the United States."

Schools

Modern Singapore has one of the world's finest education systems. It is an important element in the country's phenomenal economic performance as one of the Asian Tigers. The key element of course is free market capitalis, but an effective education system enables a broad spectrum of the country's young people to participate in the economic oportunities created by one of the most vibrant economies in Asia. Sinapore education is a kind of melding of secular British education and high academic styandards with traditional Chinese respect for learning and scholarship. It proved to be a model for China. Deng Xiaoping from an rarly point began to talk about Singapore and the other Asian tigers. Sinngaporr has excellent publuc schools in addition to many fine private schools. Almost all Singapore school children wear school uniforms. The tradition is very well established. They are required by the Government at state schoolds, although the Government does not mandate the style ad color. Singapore was a former British colony and school uniforms were well established in the colonial era. Uniforms were furing the colonial period the traditional British school boy uniforms. Modern Singapore uniforms are more casual than the traditional English styles. Given the warm climate, boys wear short pants and open-necked shirts.

Youth Groups

There are eight uniformed youth groups in Singapore. All these uniform groups are left behind as a relic of the British colonial rule, from which the county gained independence in 1965. The largest groups are the Ntional Police Cadets and the National Cadets. This is unlike many other countries, especially countries with British colonial backgrounds. There are both coed and single gender groups and there are groups with both primary and secondary school age membership and other that are restricted to secondary school members.







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Created: 12:56 AM 3/11/2008
Last updated: 8:19 PM 11/25/2011