Canadian Boys' Hair Styles


Figure 1.--This Canandian boy in 1973 wears bangs with his hair long at the side. I'm not sure precisely what to call it, probably a page boy cut. Image courtesy of Michel Coron.

As far as we can tell, Canadian boys have worn the same basic hair styles as American boys. We can not differentiate between American and Canadian images by just looking at the hair styles. Aerican and We can detect no significan differences, however, our information is very limited and mostly pertains to the 20th century. There appears to have been some French influence among French Camdian boys, but even here the basic fashion inluence appears to be American. We have begun to collect information on both hair styles and parts. And hopefully our Canadian readers will offer their insights.

Hair Styles

We have begun to collect information on the various hair styles that we have noted. We have been unable to acquire much written information, but can piece together some information from available images.

Bangs

A French Canadian reader tells us, "About bang, it was called "page boy" in Canada . Even in Québec, the English term was used without translation. I found some boys with such a hair in 1973 but really longer." The pageboy is bangs with long hear at the sides covering the ears. This is of course just one of the ways in which bangs can be dome. There are two basic variables here. First is how and what length the forehead hair is cut and arranged. The other basic variable is jow the hair at the side is cut and arranged. The bangs or fringe as they are often called in England is just the front hair combed down over the forehead. Bangs styles, hoever, include how the hair at the side is cut.

Bows

We have not noted any portraits of Canadian boys wearing hairbows. This may be a result of the limited number of images available to us. We have also not noted any hairbow images oof boys in the Canadian Notman collection, although we have only seen part of it. A HBC reader writes, "Yes, it is strange that none of the boys that I have seen in the Notman Collection have hair bows. You would think that since Quebec is a French speaking province, they would follow the French fashion. Also the photographs online have a lot of gaps in coverage. A lot of the photos are from 1880, 1885, and 1891 with in intervening years missing. It would also be interesting to know if romper and choupettes hair styles were popular in the provance in the forties and fifties. I did find one child in a dress and rinlets with a hair ribbon that I think is a boy, but I can't be sure."

Choupette

A French Candian reader tells us, "Something about choupette. Here in Québec, we used the term Houppette from a tale by Perrault, " Riquet à la Houppe ". Choupette cannot be found in the Robert Dictionary. A good example of a houppe or houppette: TINTIN by Hergé has a houppe. Houppette is synonymous of 'Toupet'." A French Candian reader tells us, "Something about choupette. Here in Québec, we used the term Houppette from a tale by Perrault, " Riquet à la Houppe ". Choupette cannot be found in the Robert Dictionary. A good example of a houppe or houppette: TINTIN by Hergé has a houppe. Houppette is synonymous of 'Toupet'." A French reader writes, "Our French Canadian reader is right, the real name is " houpette ", but in everyday speech and more in the children language we were saying choupette before the 1960s in France. Any way, is cuter to hear choupette than houpette. When I was little boy, I was using only choupette. It is alike , " maman" and " mamman" ( the French prononciation are different ). The word "mamman " is not found in the dictionary thought it is commonly used by French children. All the young children say "mamman " and not "maman". I have notice a lot of old french expressions that are not find in the dictionary. By chance my memory is rather good and I remember many such things. We can find again the sense of former French expression in the old magazines. This is one reason why they are precious. We have not noted a lot of Canadian boys with choupettes, but we note group portait of brothers with bangs and the baby of the family wearing a choupette in the early 20th century.

Page Boy

This Canandian boy in 1973 wears bangs with his hair long at the side. I'm not sure precisely what to call it, probably a page boy cut (figure 1). A French reader writes, "I am afraid, but there does not seem to be a French term for this hair style. In the 1970s, we were saying " Des cheveux mi-longs " or " des cheveux longs ".

Ringlet Curls

We note Canadian boys wearing ringletv curls in the 1860s. This may have been a popular style earlier, but we do not have eralier portraits in our archives to assess this. The styles of ringlets appeat to have been very simnilar to those worn by American boys. We are not sure how common they were. We notice boys wearing them with both dresses, kilts, and kneepants. We do not know if French and English-soeaking families differed as to how popular this style was. We note that in Europe it was more popular in England than in France. In fact the French called ringlets English curls. The McCord Museum in Montreal has a photograph taken of "Mrs. Taylors Boys" It is from their Notman archive of photographs. Notman was an important Canadian photographer. The portrait was taken in Montreal, I think in 1882. It looks to be two brothers close in age dressed in matching Highland kilt outfits. Strangely one boy has ringlet curls and the other straight hair of about the same length. We are not sure why they are dressed alike and their hair done so differently.

Short Hair

Canadian boys have generally worn various styles of short hair, exceot in the 1970s and early 80s. As far as we know the same styles poular in the United States were popular in Canada and the same names used for these styles.

Parts

We note the same basic hair parts in Canada as we have noted in Britain and America. We do not know of any destinctive Canadian styles. We have no written information on Canadian hair parts, but have begun to collect some images to demonstrate some of the basic types of parts. In many casres the parts can not even be made out and in other instajnces there are razor parts where the mother has given great attention to combing the part.








HBC







Visit HBC Canadian Pages:
[Return to the Main national hair page]
[Return to the Main Canadian country page]
[Canadian art] [Canadian catalogs] [Canadian choirs] [Canadian families] [Canadian First Communions]
[Canadian long stockings] [Canadian school uniform] [Canadian television] [Canadian youth groups]



Navigate the Boys' Historical Clothing Web Site:
[Return to the Main country page]
[Introduction] [Activities] [Biographies] [Chronology] [Clothing styles] [Countries]
[Bibliographies] [Contributions] [FAQs] [Glossaries] [Glossary] [Images] [Links] [Registration] [Tools]
[Boys' Clothing Home]





Created: October 9, 2003
Last updated: 4:41 AM 11/13/2013