Qatari Boys' Clothes


Figure 1.--These Qatari boys attend a school which had a Western type uniform. They have changed after school into their traditional Arab clothing. Note their cuff links. The group is wearing standard headwear. The headwear scarfe is the 'kaffyeh'. The black cord is the 'igal'. called a ??? fits onto the head. There are at a bird and pet souq (market). One boy has purchased pet food. Their clothese seem to be a kind of mational dress. We even see statuettes with these garments.

Qatar is a peninsula jutting north into the Persian Gulf just north of the United Arab Emirates. The citizens are called Qataris. They are descended from several migratory tribes that noved into the peninsula during from the neighboring areas of Nejd and Al-Hasa (18th century). Other Qataris are from neighboring Gulf emirates and also from Persian merchants. The population is about 1.5 million people. Most live in the the cpital--Doha. Qatar is in the unusual position that most of the population is foreigners, Foreigners with temporary residence status comprises as much as 75 percent of the population. As there are many undocumented workers, the total population is even larger. The foreign workers come from many different countries. Many are South Asians (India ans Pakistan). Others are from other Asian states or Iran. Most foreign workers are single or individuals with families in their country of origin. There is also a Western community with technical skills. The Qatar economy was traditionally based on pearling, fishing, and commerce. Qatar in the early 20th century was the center of the Persian Gulf fishing fleet. After World War II when the Japanese developed a cultured pearl industry, the Qatari oearl industry declined. The petroleum industry was developed after World War II. The economy is now based on petroileum and the industries like banking and construction financed by oil income. Qataris are largely Sunni Muslims. Islam is the official religion and Islamic jurisprudence is the foundation of Qatari law. Civil courts have jurisdiction over commercial law. Arabic is the official language. Qatar has used its oil income to build an extensive education is system. Education is compulsory and free for all government employees' children from 6-16 years old. A substantial number of Qatari citizens are enoloyed byv the Government. Qatar has as a result a high literacy rate. Clothing was largely traditional until after World War II when the oil industry developed. Most boys noiw wear Western dress, but for special occasions wear traditional clothing.

Geography

Qatar is a peninsula jutting north into the Persian Gulf just north of the United Arab Emirates.

Population

The citizens are called Qataris. They are descended from several migratory tribes that noved into the peninsula during from the neighboring areas of Nejd and Al-Hasa (18th century). Other Qataris are from neighboring Gulf emirates and also from Persian merchants. The population is about 1.5 million people. Most live in the the cpital--Doha. Qatar is in the unusual position that most of the population is foreigners, Foreigners with temporary residence status comprises as much as 75 percent of the population. As there are many undocumented workers, the total population is even larger. The foreign workers come from many different countries. Many are South Asians (India ans Pakistan). Others are from other Asian states or Iran. Most foreign workers are single or individuals with families in their country of origin. There is also a Western community with technical skills.

History

Like other areas in the Middle Wast, there is evidence of humam habitation dating back millenia. The modern history of Qatar has been dominated by the Al Khalifa family of Bahrain. Pressed by Qatari nobles, the British helped negotiate the end at the request of Bahraini claim, although Qatar continued tp pay a tribute (1868). except for the payment of tribute. The Ottoman Empire only a few years later occupied Qatar and this put an end to the tribute (1872). The Ottomans withdrew from Qatar upon entering World war I (1914). The British recognized Sheikh Abdullah bin Jassim Al Thani as emir. The Al Thani family had roots in Qatar dating back two centuries. Sheikh Abdullah signed a treaty with the British (1916). The treaty was comparable to treaties negotiated by the British with other Gulf emirates establishing protectorates. The treaties primarily dealt with foreign policy and did not intrude ijnto domestic affairs. Sheikh Abdullah agreed not to make any territorial concessions except to the U.K. and not to negotiate treaties with other countries without British consent. The British committed to protect Qatar from foreign attack. The commitment was stronger in the case of naval attack. A subsequentb treaty granted a fuller British commitment (1934). The Qatari Government granted a 75-year oil concession was granted to the Qatar Petroleum Company (QPC) (1935). The QPC was a subsidiary of the Iraq Petroleum Company, which was owned by Anglo-Dutch, French, and U.S. interests. Important oil finds occurred just after the onset of World War II at Dukhan, along the western coast of the peninsula (1940). World War II delayed development of this and subsequent finfs. Qatar after World War II began exporting oil (1949). At the time, Qatar was a poverty stricken back water. Oil would fundamentally change Qatar.

Economy

The Qatar economy was traditionally based on pearling, fishing, and commerce. Qatar in the early 20th century was the center of the Persian Gulf fishing fleet. After World War II when the Japanese developed a cultured pearl industry, the Qatari oearl industry declined. The petroleum industry was developed after World War II. The economy is now based on petroileum and the industries like banking and construction financed by oil income.

Human Rights


Activities

We note Aqyari boys in a range of actuvities. Of course school is a major activity and has been fiven considerable emphasis in recent years. Trligion is an important activity as in all Arab states. Sports are plated, especially football. Overall sports, however, are not as common as in Western countries. Girls sactivities are far more resrricted than boys activities, although not as much as in the past. Shopping malls as in the West hazve become an important area of children';s activities. We note A children's theme section to a shopping mall. After the ood court there is a indoor fun fayr with attractions for children. The circus theme is used. Meanwhile in another part of doha in the pet Souq its bird and small pets night. People including the two boys have brought birds to auction. Other boys wearing Arabic costume are visiting the bird auction and have bought animal feed for their pets.

Garments

Clothing in Qatar was largely traditional even in mpdern times. To some extent this was the power of tradition in a deeply conservative society. Traditional dress is standard Arab garments. This reflects the origins of Qatrari citizens. We do not know if any specificall Qatari garments. Another factor was the poverty of Arabia and Persian Gulf emirates. This did not begin to change until after World War II when the oil industry developed. Most boys now extensively wear Western dress. They often wear Western-style school uniforms and play clothes. We are not entirely sure why this is. Do boys prefer Western clothes? The fact that Western clothes are more utilitarian for activities seems to be a major factor. You can't very well play sports in traditional clothing. We see boys for special occasions wearing traditional clothing. We are not sure how common this is. Nor are we sure about social-class conventions. Adults are more likely to wear traditional clothing than children. This may be a political/religious statement.





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Created: 10:11 PM 10/23/2009
Last updated: 12:13 AM 4/18/2010