Austrian Boys' Dresses


Figure 1.--The boy here is apparently Pejn H. from Graz in 1891. We are not sure how to describe the type of dress. We might call this a belted dress. Notice the bodice is different than the skirt part. There is an added collar and bow here. Also notice the skirt is pleated. This boy is wearing knee pants with the dress. This was more common with tunic suits. The studio was Leop. Bude, K.K. Hof-Photograph. The walking stick prop seems to have been used to emphasize the facrt thart the child is a boy.

Younger Austrian boys like other European boys wore dresses. We so not yet have much information on this convention in Austria or the dress styles Austria boys wore over time. We do not how the convention of younger boys wearing drsses compared with other countries in general and Germany in particular. Nor do we know much about chronological trends. We see some boys in the 19th century wearing drsses. We think boys wore dresses throughout the 19th century, although we have no information on the early 19th century, The photographic record clearly show boys wearing dresses in the late-19th century. There are, however, few 20th century examples. We are not sure how to describe the type of dress see here (figure 1). We might call this a belted dress. Notice the bodice is different than the skirt part. Also notice the skirt is pleated. Our Austrian archive is still very limited. This makes it difficult to assess trends like age conventions. The boy here is apparently Pejn H. from Graz in 1891. We are not sure what boys wore under their dresses. The most common under garments seem to be petticoats and pantalettes. Note that the boy here wears knee pants with the dress. This was more common with tunic suits. We also do not yet know much about gender trends, namely to what extent the there were dresses specifically styled for boys. We also have little information on the accompanying garments like headwear. We notice some boys with added collars and bows. Long stockings seem common. ,

Prevalence

Younger Austrian boys like other European boys wore dresses. We so not yet have much information on this convention in Austria. We do not how the convention of younger boys wearing drsses compared with other countries in general and Germany in particular.

Styles

We do not know much about the dress styles Austria boys wore over time. We are not sure how to describe the type of dress see here (figure 1). We might call this a belted dress. Notice the bodice is different than the skirt part. Also notice the skirt is pleated.

Chronology

We have just begun to collect information on chronological trends. We see some boys in the 19th century wearing drsses. We think boys wore dresses throughout the 19th century, although we have no information on the early-19th century. Photography became available at mid-century, although photographs in Austria and Germany did not take off as it did in Ameeica. Thus images from the 1840s and 50s are much less common. we only have images beginning in the late-19th centuyry. The photographic record clearly show Austrian boys wearing dresses in the late-19th century. The styles we note diring the late-19th century varied. The boy here wears a belted dress in 1891. Another boy in 1882 wears what looks lrather like a tubular dress. There are, however, few 20th century examples.

Age

Our Austrian archive is still very limited. This makes it difficult to assess trends like age conventions. The examples we have found so far are all younger boys up to abnout 4 years of age. Our sampke is so small, however, that we can not yet draw any firm conclusions.

Accompnying Clothing

We also have little information on the accompanying garments like headwear. We notice some boys with added collars and bows. Long stockings seem common.

Underwear

We are not sure what boys wore under their dresses. The most common under garments seem to be petticoats and pantalettes, the sane undergarments girls wore. Note that the boy here wears knee pants with the dress rather than underwear garments. This was more common with tunic suits.

Gender

We also do not yet know much about gender tremds, namely to what extent the there were dresses specifically styled for boys.

Individuals

The boy here is apparently Pejn H. from Graz in 1891 (figure 1).







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Created: 12:29 AM 3/6/2010
Last updated: 12:29 AM 3/6/2010