Mexican Revolution: Madero Presidency (1911-13)

Mexican Revolution boy soldier
Figure 1.- Madero after Díaz tried to reverse the results in the 1910 election led resistance to Díaz and the stolen election. He assumed the presidency (1911). He was intent on reconciling the badly shaken country. Madero had suceeded in forcing Díaz out, jowevrer, by temporarily unifying various democratic and anti-Díaz forces. This included elements that were mutually incompatable and essentialy not willing to be reconciled.

Madero after Díaz tried to reverse the results in the 1910 election led resistance to Díaz and the stolen election. Madero entered Mexico City (June 7, 1911). He was elected president by a landslide in a free democratic election (October 1911). Madeo won with a higher percentage of the voye thar Díaz had ever achieved in rigged elections He was intent on reconciling the badly shaken country. Despite his electoral mandate and the best of intentions, problems soon developed. Madero had suceeded in forcing Díaz out by temporarily unifying various democratic and anti-Díaz forces. This included elements that were mutually incompatable and essentialy not willing to be reconciled. Among the anti-Díaz forces were wealthy land-owners and others not at all committed to democratic government in Mexico. A strong leader would have found reconciliatiin difficult and Madero was more of a saint than a forceful leader. He attempted a series of moderate reforms. The reforms were a disappointment to the revolutionaries who wanted more drastic action. They were even more vehemently opposed by the conservatives who were adament about preserving the existing order. There problem was with Díaz not with the Porfirato system Díaz had created. Madero was an idealistic lawyer without the political or leadership skills and experience capable of controlling the pasions relesed with Díaz's departure or the conservtive reaction to his reforms. Madero did not last long as president. Mexico soon spun out of his control. After Díaz was forced from Mexico, Madero did not replace the Porfirista military with his supporters. As a result the Mexican Army which was the principal force in the country was controlled by men at odds with President Madero, men who Madero trusted to do their duty. At the same time, many of Madero's supportrs were disappointed with his performance. Even Zapata denounced the President. After years of censorship, Mexican newspapers took advantage of their newly found freedom of the press to criticize Madero's performance as president harshly. Gustavo A. Madero, the president's brother, remarked that "the newspapers bite the hand that took off their muzzle." Francisco Madero refused the recommendation of some of his advisors that he bring back censorship. Victoriano Huerta pledged allegiance to the Madero administration. Huerta was one of many officers who supported Díaz that Madero retained. Huerta was instrumental in supressing revolts by rebel generals, especially one led by Pascual Orozco.







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Created: 4:43 AM 3/12/2014
Last updated: 4:43 AM 3/12/2014