The American Revolutionary War: Coming of War


Figure 1.--Many Loyalists had to or chose to leave America. One of these was the most estemed artist od Colonial America--John Singleton Copley. Here we see him and his family in England during 1777. (Boston was in the hands of the Colonials.) His father-in-law is with them. It was his tea that the Sons of Liberty dumped into Boston Harbor.

The winners in the Revolution was the American-born middle class. There were limits on the horrizons. for colonils from humbel horizons. This allowed much great social mobility than would have been possible under class-bown British rule. There were also losers. About 80,000 Royalists left America and many others would have left if it had been possible. This was a not inconsequential part of the population at the time. The big losers were the Native Americans. British policy at the time was to restrict migration west beyond the Apalachans. The British with the Quebec Act (1774) were proceeding to effectively reserve the Ohio Valley to French Canadians and their Indian allies. The defeat of the British removed any real restriction on westward migration and as a result, Native Americans were relentlessly pushed west in the next century. Oter losers were black slaves. Had Britain maintained its American colonies, abolition would have come sooner. Another consequence of the War was a change in British imperial policy. The flexibility that Britain failed to show in its relations with the American colonists, it did shown in its policies toward the Dominion states like Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa--countries that played a key role in Britain's victory in World war II.

Winners

The winners in the Revolution was the American-born middle class. There were limits on the horrizons. for colonils from humbel horizons. This allowed much great social mobility than would have been possible under class-bown British rule.

Losers

There were also losers. About 80,000 Royalists left America and many others would have left if it had been possible. Most did not, however, do as well in England as they had been doing in America. America lost its most prestigious artist--John Singleton Copley. The Boston merchant family, the Coffins fought with the British and also had to leave America. The Loyalists were not inconsequential part of the population at the time and of course a much larger number had Loyalist sympathies. The big losers were the Native Americans. British policy at the time was to restrict migration west beyond the Apalachans. The British with the Quebec Act (1774) were proceeding to effectively reserve the Ohio Valley to French Canadians and their Indian allies. The defeat of the British removed any real restriction on westward migration and as a result, Native Americans were relentlessly pushed west in the next century. Oter losers were black slaves. Had Britain maintained its American colonies, abolition would have come sooner. Another consequence of the War was a change in British imperial policy. The flexibility that Britain failed to show in its relations with the American colonists, it did shown in its policies toward the Dominion states like Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa--countries that played a key role in Britain's victory in World War II.







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Created: 11:28 AM 7/4/2005
Last updated: 11:28 AM 7/4/2005