United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration--UNRRA (1943- )


Figure 1.--Although we do not know the details, some Yugoslave children were evacuated to UNRRA camps in North Africa. This photograph was taken in March 1946. The UNRRA caption read, "After a year of desperately hard living in the mountains of Yugoslavia, while his mother and father fought the Germans, little Stoyan came to an UNRRA refugee camp for Yugoslavs in the Middle East. He looks like a baby, one year old, but he is really three. There are scores of children like Stoyan. They are put into UNRRA camp hospitals where they are given vitamin foods and nursed back to good spirits and health." UNRRA file no. S-0800-0018-09-00001. Photographer: Baron."

The needs of the World War II Displaced Persons were anticipated by the United States. American authorities were not fully aware of the enormity of the NAZI crimes in the occupied countries, but it was clear that there were large numbers of displaced persons. The United States thus helped established and fund the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration--UNRRA (1943). The purpose of the new agency was to provide services for the postwar refugees and to help repatriate them to their own countries. UNRRA was not created specifically to assist Jewish refugees, but refugees in general. Because of NAZI race policies, however, Jews were the group most affected by the War and in need of assistance. While established in 1943, UNRRA could not begin its principal work until NAZI occupied Europe was liberated. UNRRA opened camps in North Africa and began prepsrations for its work when after D-Day and Soviets offences in the East, the NAZI empire was rapidly dimantalled. UNRRA was in place when Germany surrendered (May 1945). The collpase of the NAZI war economy and the homocidal administration of many NAZI camps meant that huge numbers of people were in desperate straits when the Allies reached them. UNRRA had the task of saving millions of starving individuals and organizing the homeward journey of most of the refugees. UNRRA set up refugee camps in old schools, military barracks, even barns. These camps were meant to be short-term transit camps, and in fact most non-Jewish refugees within a year and a half had been returned to theit home countries, an amazing accomplishment. Jewish refugees, however, presented an especially difficult problem. [Greenfeld] In most cases they were unwilling or unable to go home. Returning people to Soviet occupied countries was another major problem.

NAZI War Crimes

NAZI crimality is often described as war crimes. The killing was not limited to the War, but the great bulk of the killing did take place during the War--but often not part of military operations. There were actual war crimes, but the most horrendous crimes were killing civilians that were not a threat and had nothing to do with the war. German military successes early in the War put the NAZIs in a position to carry out these crimes and the killing was conducted during the War. And not all of the killing was done by NAZI organizations. The Wehrmacht was involved as well doctors iand nurses in civilian hospitals and healt facilities. The ultimate authority for these actions, however was the NAZI government instaled by Reich Führer Adolf Hitler. The most serious war crimes was the mistreatment and muder of POWS. Here there was a destinction between POWs in the East and West. Not only did huge numbers of Russian and Polish POWs perish, but large numbers of prisoners were executed as a result of the Commisar and Commando Orders. Both prisoners and and civilians were killed as a result of the Reprisal order. The NAZI engineered Holocaust of the Jews is the best documented example of mass murder in history. This is because the NAZIs lost World War II and the copious records they took along with the testimony of individuals conducting the Holocust and their surviving victims have left us with a chilling historical record. The NAZI Holocaust succeeded in killing about 6 million Jews. This was not the largest instance of mass murder in history, but is perhaps the most horific because of the way the SS industrialized the killing process. Another 6 million non-Jews perished, mosrtly Eastern Europeans. Many perished as a result of the NAZI slave and forced labor prograjmns to support yhe war effort. Less well understood is the fact that if the NAZIs had succedded in would have been only the first chapter in a terrifying rengineering of the Human race. High on the NAZI list of untermench were the Slavs of Eastern Rurope. The NAZIs killed many more people than Jews in their preliminary efforts to build a new German empire in the Occupied East. There was also the Lebensborn program aimed at children. In all the NAZIs probably killed more than 20 million people. The NAZI penchant for killing was such that they killed millions of people who could have assisted in their war effort. And as a result, before the Allies destroyed German industry in the strategic bombing campaign, there was a severe labor shortage in the Reich. The subject of NAZI war crimes does not address the crimes committed in Germany agaist Germans. Here again, children were one of the main targets. The domestic programs were outgrowths of the German eugenics movement and included the Hereditary Health Courts and sterilization progrm. Here the most horrendous undertaking ws the T-4 Program.

Public Perceptions

The needs of the World War II Displaced Persons were anticipated by the United States. The American public and even well-enformed authorities were not fully aware of the enormity of the NAZI crimes in the occupied countries. They in fact defy understanding. It was clear that there were large numbers of displaced persons with enormous needs.

Foundation

The United States helped established and fund the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration--UNRRA (1943). U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt proposed the agency (June 1943) to provide relief in areas liberated from the Axis powers. Mrs. Roosevelt was a strong supporter from the beginning. The focus from the beginning was on areas liberated from the NAZIs in Europe. More than 40 other countries endorsed the effort. to form the first "United Nations" organization. The founding document was signed by 44 countries in the White House in Washington (November 9, 1943). It was called a United Nations agency, but the United Nations did not yet exist. And the United States was the only country in the position to provide assistance at the level needed. The purpose of the new agency was to provide services for the postwar refugees and to help repatriate them to their own countries. Its charter charged it to "plan, co-ordinate, administer or arrange for the administration of measures for the relief of victims of war in any area under the control of any of the United Nations through the provision of food, fuel, clothing, shelter and other basic necessities, medical and other essential services". The staff consisted of about 12,000 people, with headquarters in New York.

Jews

UNRRA was not created specifically to assist Jewish refugees, but refugees in general. Because of NAZI race policies, however, Jews were the group most affected by the War and most in need of assistance. But most of the Jews who fell into NAZI hands were murdered. Thus the numbers of Jews who could be helped were tragically limited. By the time UNRAA was operational, most of the Jews that the Germans had bee able to round up had been killed. Another problem was the initial UNRRA charter. The charter empowered UNRRA to provide aid only to nationals from the United Nations (Allied nations). This thus did not include German Jews or Jews from other Axis nations (Bulgaria, Hungary, and Romania). Jewish organizations brought this issue to the attention of President Roosevelt. This was thus changed (late-1944). Ironically, it was German Jews who were often the most likely to have survived the Holocaust. The change added the phase, 'other persons who have been obliged to leave their country or place of origin or former residence or who have been deported there from by action of the enemy because of race, religion or activities'. UNRAA was unable to assist the Jews in German hands, only those who had escaped from Germany occupied areas or who managed to survive until liberation.

Liberation

While established in 1943, UNRRA could not begin its principal work until NAZI occupied Europe was liberated. Some work could be done in North Africa. UNRRA opened its first camps in North Africa. More work could begin d after the Sicily (uly 1943) and Itlanian (September 1943) invasions the work in Europe could begin. UNRRA prepsrations for its work began in earest when after D-Day and Soviets offences in the East. Work could begin in France (June 1944), Belgium and the Netherlands (September 1944), and Greece (October 1944). The primary goal of assisting the DPs, however, could only begin after the Allies entered the Reich and liberated the NAZI concentration and labor camps (March 1945). The NAZI empire was rapidly dimantalled. UNRRA was in place when Germany surrendered (May 1945).

Desperate Situation

The collpase of the NAZI war economy (November 1944) and the homocidal administration of many NAZI camps meant that huge numbers of people were in desperate straits when the Allies reached them (1944-45). UNRRA had the task of saving millions of starving individuals and organizing the homeward journey of most of the refugees. UNRRA set up refugee camps in old schools, military barracks, nunneries, even barns. What ever space they could find. We note an image of UNRAA workers helping DP children in an old nunnery. They even used some NAZI camps. UNRRA was especially active in 1945 and 1946. UNRRA oversaw extensive operations in occupied Germany, mostly to operate camps for Displaced Persons. The Germans had brought 11 million peope into the Reich, mostly forcibly, to provide labor for the NAZI war economy. UNRRA did not, however, provide assistance to ethnic Germans

Resources

Most of the resources available to UNRRA came from the United States. The dmensions of the problem were such tht only government action could meet the desperate immediate need. Funding came from many countries and totaled $3.7 billion, of which the United States Government contributed $2.7 billion; Britain $0.6 billion, and Canada $0.1 billion. Other countries contributed smaller amounts. The British contribution is notable considering the fact that the British people were suffering few a very strict ratiuoning program. UNRRA was not just a government effort. Not all the aid was from the United States and other governments. An important part of the effort was the activities of private charitable organiizations. It addition to American and other government funding, assistance was provided by many private groups, mostly in the United States. Many Americans were touched by the images they saw in the newsreels and periodical publications and wanted to help. UNRRA frcm the beginning worked closely with volunteer charitable organizations which were already in existence at the time UNRRA was founded. They sent hundreds of experiences aid workers to work with UNRRA. They also help launch drives to collect food and clothing which could be distributed in war ravaged Europe.

Success

The bulk of UNRRAs work was done in 3 years (1944-47). UNRRA managed to destribute about $4 billion worth of goods, food, medicine, clothing, tools, and farm implements to a continrent awash with desperate people. The DPs were the most desperate, but large numbers of people who were still in their communities were also deperately short of food and other essentials. There were shortages of everything in Europe and the transportation system was destroyed in Europe and barely operating in the liberated countries. The UNRRA camps for DPs were meant to be short-term transit camps, and in fact most non-Jewish refugees within a year and a half had been returned to their home countries, an amazing accomplishment. UNRRA was certainly not perfect. There were reports of inefficiency, poor planning, shortages as well as incompetent personnel. There were also some reports of corruption--mostly associate with the Chinese Nationalists. Given the enormity of the problem and the need to rapidly deliver aid to prevenbt an humanitarian disaster, UNRRA's performance in Europe was a major success. [Hitchcock, p. 225.] We might say it was more accurately described as a near mirracle. UNRRA was thus able to largely shut down operations (1947). As an American relief effort, UNRRA was largely replaced by the Marshall Plan (1948).

Jewish Refugees

Jewish refugees presented an especially difficult problem. [Greenfeld] UNRAA attempted to provide emergency relief as needed and to ger refugees back to their countries of origin. This was not easy in the case of thge Jewish refugees. In most cases they were unwilling or unable to go home. The NAZI killing process was so sucessful, that the communities that they had come from no longer existed. Some Jews trying to return home were attacked, especially in Eastern Europoe. An especially egrious pogrom occurred in Poland. And many Jews were afraid to return home because of the way many of their countrymen had cooperated with the NAZIs. So the primary UNRAA policy of getting the refugees home could not be pursued in the case of most Jewish refugees. And the children were a special mproblem because in most cases their parents and even extended famikly were all dead. UNRAA provided support for displaced persons camps, but Jewish oirganization from an early point organized the Jews in these camps. At the time Israel did not exist. And the British to placate the Arabs were not allowing Jewish migration into Palestine. Jewish organizations attempted to get somec refugees ito Palestine surepticously.

Soviet Regugees

Returning people to Soviet occupied countries was another major problem.

United Nations

UNRRA became part of the United Nations when thast organization wsas founded in San Franciso (1945). UNRRA's functions were eventually split up among several agencies as the United Nations developed, primarily the International Refugee Organization and the World Health Organization.

Sources

Greenfeld, Howard. After the Holocaust (Greenwillow Books/HarperCollins Publishers, 2001).

Hitchcock, William I. The Bitter Road to Freedom: The Human Cost of Allied Victory in World War II Europe (2009).






HBC






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Created: 1:54 AM 9/1/2010
Last updated: 6:30 PM 11/9/2013