*** war and social upheaval: World War II The Battle of the Bulge -- final NAZI Christmas








World War II: Final NAZI Christmas (December 1944)

armor in the Bulge
Figure 1.-- The Germans secretly ammassed the armor they had left tor ione last desoperate thrust in the vertv place they had achieved theirv greatest victory--the Ardennes. The population in the Euifel were impressed with the gathering firces like the boy here, but Allied inteligence, even Ultra did not accurately assess the sutuation. And the Allied High Command did not think the Germans capable of a major offensive. Few German families had fathers and older brothers left at home for Christmas creating a disheartening Christmas spirit. Then for a precious few days the German media began reporting miraculous victories in the Ardennes with the Panzers again driving forward, deep into Allied lines (December 16). This continued for several days. Than suddenly the German media stopped reporting victories. Every German by this time knew what silence meant--the ominous defeat of Hitler's last desperate offensive.

Christmas is a very special time in Western countries, both for family and religious reasons. It is the one time of the year that the family if at all possible gets together to share the holiday festivities. This was perhaps more true for the Germans than any other people. Adolf Hitler and his war shattered this tradition. It all want well until until the Red Army counter-offensive before Moscow not only stopped the Germans cold (December 1941), but drove then back--inflicting huge losses in men and equipment. This was the first point at which the War truly began coming home for the German people. But most did not give up, believing that their beloved Führer with all his miraculous achievements would soon put matters right. Then the next Christmas with the Sixth Army surrounded in the Stalingrad pocket (December 1942). Goebbels staged a fake radio event with German unit calling in from the far-flung reaches of the NAZI empire, including Stalingrad. The surrender of the Sixth Army (February 1943) is when most thinking Germans realized that they were not gong to win the War. Final NAZI Christmas (December 1944) was perhaps the saddest in German history. The Red Army had penetrated into the Reich and moving toward the Oder. The German media was reporting terrible atrocities, especially the raping of women and girls. In the West, the Allies were approaching the Rhine on a Broad Front and had already reached it in some areas. The Luftwaffe had been destroyed and the Allied bombers were reducing German's great industrial cities to vast piles of smoking rubble. With the Wehrmacht driven out of the occupied countries, German armies could no longer seize food and ship it back to the Reich. Thus rather than the traditional roast goose, German mothers were having trouble scrounging for the bare necessities. Worst of all--the men were absent in the faily Christmas celebration, either dead, captured, or fighting hopeless battles at the front. Goebbels had mobilized even boys and old men for the Volkssturm (October 1944). Few families as a result had their fathers, husbandfs and older brothers left at home for Christmas creating a disheartening Christmas spirit. Then for a precious few days the German media began reporting miraculous victories in the Ardennes with the Panzers again driving forward, deep into Allied lines (December 17). This continued for several days. Than suddenly the German media stopped reporting victories. Every German by this time knew what silence meant--the ominous defeat of Hitler's last desperate offensive. The desperation is elected in the fact that the Panzers here were to be refuled in capatured American fuel depots.







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Created: 9:37 PM 5/5/2024
Last updated: 9:37 PM 5/5/2024