Children's Literature: Soviet Union--Authors


Figure 1.-- One reader remembers Krapivin's book The Tales of the Old Arbat. Like many of Krapivin's books, the story includes children an fastasy creatures. Arbat is best known street in Moscow, the principal commercial street of the city where clothes and toys are purchased. Like some of Krapivin's books, it was illustrated by Evgeniy Medvedev. The illustrations show the short pants and long stockings worn by Soviet bows during the 1950s. They also show the " valenki " -- the kind of felt boots typically worn during the cold Russian winters, even inside the home.

We have limited information on Soviet authors of children's books. Soviet children's books wre not distributed in the West and, as a result, HBC has little information on them. Some authors we have noted include Krapivin, Marshak, Neverov, and Politschuk. There were many others. A HBC reader tells us that Vladislav Krapivin was the most famous modern Russian author of the books for children during the late Soviet period. Krapivin had a close association with Evgeniy Medvedev who illustrated many of his books. We have little information on these authors and their work. Hopefully our Russian readers will provide more information on these authors.

Dragunsky, Viktor (1913-72)

Viktor Dragunsky was a Soviet children writer. He was born in United States, in New York in 1913 in the family of Russian immigrants, but his parents soon returned to Russia. He worked as a theater/movie actor, as a clown in circus and as a screenplay writer. But he became famous after in 1959 he started to publish small novels about everyday life of a small Russian schoolboy Denis Korablev. After Dragunsky’s death in 1972 all those novels were composed into one big book “Denis’s Stories”. His most beloved novels among Russian children are: “He’s alive and shines” “A mistery letter” “A girl on the globe” “What I love” “Smell of the sky and tobacco” “25 kilograms exactly” “Phantomas” “20 years long under the bed” and so on Based on various Dragunsky’s novels about Denis Korablev there were taken several children movies in Sovien Union: “Funny Stories” (1962) “Where can it be seen, where can it be heard” (1973) “Captain” (1973) “A spyglass” (1973) “A fire in a house meaning rescue under the ice” (1974) “Wonderful adventures of Denis Korablev” (1979) In all stories Dennis is pictured as a cheerful and active first-grader who lives in Moscow with his mom and dad.

Krapivin, Vladislav

A HBC reader tells us that Vladislav Krapivin was the most famous modern Russian author of the books for children during the late Soviet period. Krapivin had a close association with Evgeniy Medvedev who illustrated many of his books. Some books were about realistic childhood experiences such a children away fom home in summer camps. One reader remembers Krapivin's book The Tales of the Old Arbat. Some of Krapivin's books included children an fastasy creatures. Arbat is best known street in Moscow, the principal commercial street of the city where clothes and toys are purchased. Like many of Krapivin's books, it was illustrated by Medvedev. The illustrations show the short pants and warm-looking long stockings worn by Soviet bows during the 1950s. They also show the " valenki " -- the kind of felt boots typically worn during the cold Russian winters, even inside the home.

Marshak


Neverov


Politschuk


Lubov Voronkova

Lubov Voronkova was active in the 1960s. We do not know a great deal about the author at this time. We notice his book Masha-rastyeryasha (Masha-loose-all-things). The book was published in the mid-1960s. Thwre were some nicely done illustrations by Henrich Valk. One illustration shows a child putting her stockings on in the morning. Here you can note that instead of garter waists or other support garmenrs, stockings were supported with special buttons on panties before tights replaced stockings. The child in the illustration is a girl on the pic, but in the period illustrated, girls and boys wore similiar underwear and hosiery.

Vladimir Suteev (1903-93)

Vladimir Suteev was a prolific illustrator and creator of cartoons. Some people called him the "Russian Disney" for his incredible cartoons about animals. He was also an author and Usually illustrated his own stories. Here's an illustration for the tale "January" which is about fir trees.







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Created: 12:15 AM 9/2/2005
Last updated: 12:53 PM 2/12/2011